miércoles, 8 de marzo de 2017

mycosis fungoides - Genetics Home Reference

mycosis fungoides - Genetics Home Reference

Genetics Home Reference, Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions

mycosis fungoides



Mycosis fungoides is the most common form of a type of blood cancer called cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas occur when certain white blood cells, called T cells, become cancerous; these cancers characteristically affect the skin, causing different types of skin lesions. Although the skin is involved, the skin cells themselves are not cancerous. Mycosis fungoides usually occurs in adults over age 50, although affected children have been identified.
Mycosis fungoides may progress slowly through several stages, although not all people with the condition progress through all stages. Most affected individuals initially develop skin lesions called patches, which are flat, scaly, pink or red areas on the skin that can be itchy. Cancerous T cells, which cause the formation of patches, are found in these lesions. The skin cells themselves are not cancerous; the skin problems result when cancerous T cells move from the blood into the skin. Patches are most commonly found on the lower abdomen, upper thighs, buttocks, and breasts. They can disappear and reappear or remain stable over time. In some affected individuals, patches progress to plaques, the next stage of mycosis fungoides.
Plaques are raised lesions that are usually reddish, purplish, or brownish in color and itchy. Plaques commonly occur in the same body regions as patches. While some plaques arise from patches, others develop on their own, and an affected person can have both patches and plaques simultaneously. As with patches, cancerous T cells are found in plaques. Plaques can remain stable or can develop into tumors. Not everyone with patches or plaques develops tumors.
The tumors in mycosis fungoides, which are composed of cancerous T cells, are raised nodules that are thicker and deeper than plaques. They can arise from patches or plaques or occur on their own. Mycosis fungoides was so named because the tumors can resemble mushrooms, a type of fungus. Common locations for tumor development include the upper thighs and groin, breasts, armpits, and the crook of the elbow. Open sores may develop on the tumors, often leading to infection.
Although rare, the cancerous T cells can spread to other organs, including the lymph nodes, spleen, liver, and lungs. Spread to other organs can occur in any stage of mycosis fungoides but is most common in the tumor stage. In addition, affected individuals have an increased risk of developing another lymphoma or other type of cancer.

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