jueves, 9 de marzo de 2017

Oral health matters | Health.mil

Oral health matters | Health.mil

Health.mil

Oral health matters

A Soldier with C Company, 1st Battalion, 61st Infantry Regiment brushes his teeth on a cold morning at the Victory Forge field training exercise on Fort Jackson, South Carolina. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class Brian Hamilton)



A Soldier with C Company, 1st Battalion, 61st Infantry Regiment brushes his teeth on a cold morning at the Victory Forge field training exercise on Fort Jackson, South Carolina. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class Brian Hamilton)



POor oral health adversely affects readiness and could cost you your career, but it’s something you can prevent. Despite advances in dental care and hygiene, deployed service members are still at risk of trench mouth – technically referred to as necrotizing periodontal disease (NPD). This condition can lead to painful ulcers, spontaneous gum bleeding and a foul taste in your mouth.
The good news is there are things you can do to reduce your risk of trench mouth. Learn how to be proactive and prevent NPD. Also, schedule regular visits to your dentist when possible. 
Poor Hygiene
  • You might have little to no time for oral hygiene when you’re deployed, which can cause you to fall out of your normal routine of brushing and flossing.
  • Solution: Pack a few travel-size tubes of toothpaste, dental floss, and a travel toothbrush in your kit, and establish a routine as quickly as possible.
Tobacco Use
  • Using tobacco products can lead to gum disease by reducing blood flow to your gums, which can lead to tooth loss and mouth infections.
  • Solution: It’s never too late to quit. Check out these great tips to become tobacco-free.
Poor Nutrition
  • Eating right can be challenging in the field. But not eating enough food or the right foods can cause vitamin and mineral deficiencies that reduce your ability to fight oral infections.
  • Solution: Although MREs can’t replicate the tastes of a home-cooked meal, they’re nutritionally balanced to prevent vitamin and mineral deficiencies. Eat a variety of MREs and as many of the components as you can to make sure you get all the nutrients they provide.
Stress
  • Too much stress can adversely affect your performance and overall health, including dental health. Stress can cause dry mouth and sore, inflamed gums.
  • Solution: Check out HPRC’s Stress Management section for ways to manage your stress. While activities like yoga, meditation, or journaling are very calming, try exercise, reading, or playing card games to help reduce stress too.
Disclaimer: Re-published content may have been edited for length and clarity. Read original post.




Upcoming exercises in Latin America help Air Force achieve total dental readiness

Article
3/7/2017
Eduardo Sanchez, a Dominican student, gets his teeth repaired at the Rio San Juan clinic, Dominican Republic.  Sanchez is one of more than 400 patients that received dental care during a Dental Readiness Training Exercise, an exercise where U.S. military dentists and dental technicians partnered with dental professionals from the Dominican Republic, and practiced their craft in an expeditionary environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Chenzira Mallory)
Air Force dentists, hygienists and dental technicians are gearing up for three Dental Readiness Training Exercises in Latin America
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Poor dental health leading cause of readiness issues

Article
2/24/2017
Air Force Lt. Col. Val Hagans and Army Spc. Laketa Bryant extract a patient's wisdom teeth at Kirkuk Regional Air Base, Iraq in 2010. (Photo by Air Force Staff Sgt. Tabitha Kuykendall)
Good dental health is important to overall readiness. The Military Health System has made improvements to its dental readiness.
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SuperTrack nutrition for fitness

Article
2/16/2017
Exercise and diet are ways to keep the pounds off. One of the best ways to start losing weight or just improve your nutrition overall is to keep track of what you eat and drink every day. (MHS photo illustration)
One of the best ways to start losing weight or just improve your nutrition overall is to keep track of what you eat and drink every day
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Avoid sitting disease

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2/14/2017
A DHHQ employee bikes to work. Bike or walk to work, if possible. If you don’t live close enough to bike or walk the entire commute, try walking for at least part of your travel time. For example, park further from your building. Or choose a higher level in the parking garage. (Courtesy photo)
The more time you spend sitting, the greater your risk of disease
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Screen time impacts dream time

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2/8/2017
Time spent with smartphones, tablets, and computers can impact your ability to get healthy sleep. Turn off handheld devices and televisions at least two hours before bedtime. Try to avoid lying in bed and scrolling through social media and email before bedtime too. (U.S. Air Force photo illustration by Staff Sgt. Jamal Sutter)
Time spent with smartphones, tablets, and computers can impact your ability to get healthy sleep
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February is National Children's Dental Health Month

Article
2/6/2017
From left, Air Force Staff Sgt. Soohwa Ono, Senior Airman Vanessa Rivas and Capt. Daniel Chartrand promote pediatric oral hygiene at the Kelly Child Development Center. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Kevin Iinuma)
The dental community is reaching out and educating teachers and parents on the importance of establishing good oral habits and hygiene
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Proper dental care can prevent disease

Article
2/1/2017
Navy Lt. Michelle Romeo teaches a first-grade student proper brushing techniques during  Dental Health Month at Graham A. Barden Elementary School in Havelock N.C. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Grace L. Waladkewics)
More than fighting bad breath or preventing gingivitis, research shows that dental health also contributes to the overall well-being of people
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Track your weight loss

Article
1/18/2017
Mobile apps and programs are becoming simpler and more intuitive to help monitor your healthy eating. Some programs are interactive as well. They also provide nutrition information for more than 45,000 food items, including brand name and restaurant foods. Entering foods and calculating their calories takes only a fraction of the time when compared to a “paper” food diary. (MHS graphic)
The first step to losing weight and gaining better health is using self-monitoring techniques to track your calories
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Winter-workout tips

Article
1/12/2017
Soldiers of the Army Reserve Medical Command participate in the 2-mile run as part of the Army Physical Fitness Test. With fewer hours of sunlight in the winter months, you might be walking or running when it’s dark out — even at dusk and dawn. Wear reflective gear or a headlamp to stay visible. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Marnie Jacobowitz)
It can be extra challenging to get outdoors and exercise in the winter
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New year, new fitness goals

Article
1/3/2017
Runners who are less fit and less motivated estimate the distance to a finish line as farther than do runners who are fit and highly motivated. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Micha R. Pierce)
Goals that seem more in reach often feel more desirable than ones that seem further away
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Mindful eating during the holidays

Article
12/19/2016
Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Jonathan Lewis carves turkey for a holiday dinner aboard USS Coronado.
The holiday season can be a challenging time to eat sensibly
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Busting the “fat-burning zone” myth

Article
12/13/2016
Navy Lt. Cmdr. Brian Conner, assistant navigator aboard the aircraft carrier USS George Washington, works out on the ship. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Comunication Specialist 3rd Class Kashif Basharat)
Many people assume that in order to burn fat, they must keep their heart rate within the defined range, but this can be misleading.
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Tips to treat tendonitis

Article
11/25/2016
Nearly 90 Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps freshman midshipman candidates stretch their legs during their introduction to unit physical training at Camp Navajo, Arizona, during joint New Student Orientation.
Tendonitis is a common, chronic overuse injury
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Compression garments: Do they work?

Article
11/17/2016
Most studies look at compression socks during running. Compression garments have been shown to help blood flow to working muscles during exercise, but that necessarily doesn’t translate to better performance. (U.S. Navy photo)
Compression garments come in a variety of sleeves, socks, shorts, and full-body suits
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Mixing supplements and medications

Article
10/20/2016
Interactions between drugs and supplements can result in either an increase or decrease in the effectiveness of your medications. In other words, you could be getting too much or too little of the medications that you need, which can be dangerous to your health. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hailey R. Staker)
Interactions between drugs and supplements can result in either an increase or decrease in the effectiveness of your medications
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