jueves, 9 de marzo de 2017

Preventing Traumatic Brain Injury in your child | Health.mil

Preventing Traumatic Brain Injury in your child | Health.mil

Health.mil



Preventing Traumatic Brain Injury in your child

Air Force Staff Sgt. Ashley Sandoval (left), 21st Force Support Squadron, secures Savannah Butler (right) into her car seat as Savannah's mom, Air Force Staff Sgt. Montie Butler (center) looks on. Sandoval provided car seat training to Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, parents at the Child Development Center in a program hosted by the 50th Space Wing safety office. (U.S. Air Force photo by Dennis Rogers)

Air Force Staff Sgt. Ashley Sandoval (left), 21st Force Support Squadron, secures Savannah Butler (right) into her car seat as Savannah's mom, Air Force Staff Sgt. Montie Butler (center) looks on. Sandoval provided car seat training to Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, parents at the Child Development Center in a program hosted by the 50th Space Wing safety office. (U.S. Air Force photo by Dennis Rogers)



WHen it comes to traumatic brain injury (TBI), you can’t have too much information. Traumatic brain injuries affect millions of Americans each year, and each TBI experience is unique.  Be sure to know the signs and symptoms of TBI as well as how you can prevent yourself and your loved ones from experiencing it.
TBI is caused by an external force, such as blows to the head, gunshot wounds, or the head being shaken violently. Concussion, also called mild TBI, is the most common type of brain injury and can sometimes be difficult to diagnose because a person may or may not become unconscious and the damage may or may not show up on a diagnostic imaging test, such as a CAT scan. A contusion, or a bruise on your brain, can result from a direct blow to the head and can also cause TBI.
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the leading cause of traumatic brain injury is falls. Because the brain is soft and jello-like in consistency and “floats” in cerebral-spinal fluid in our skulls, when the head is struck or shaken violently it can cause brain injury.
You can help prevent your child from getting a TBI by always using age and size-appropriate car seats, and by making sure they are properly installed. Also, make sure your child always wears the right helmet for activities such as riding a bicycle or playing sports and make sure it fits right. Wearing a helmet is a must to help lower the risk of serious brain injury and skull fracture. While helmets promote safety, please know that there’s no such thing as a “concussion-proof” helmet.
If you have a toddler, make sure to have gates at the tops and bottoms of stairs to prevent your baby from falling down them. If you take your child to the playground, make sure that there is soft material under the play equipment, like mulch or sand rather than grass or dirt.
TRICARE offers TBI treatment through a robust rehabilitation benefit that includes occupational therapy (OT), physical therapy (PT), speech therapy and behavioral health services when ordered by a physician as part of a comprehensive individual rehabilitation treatment plan. Though TRICARE does not cover Cognitive Rehabilitation Therapy as a stand-alone therapy, many physical therapists, occupational therapists and speech therapists use CRT techniques in their covered therapies and treatments for TBI. For more information, visit the Cognitive Rehabilitation Therapy page on the TRICARE website. For specific coverage details, contact your regional contractor.




DCoE Outreach Center

Infographic
3/3/2017
Call for Help 24/7 1-866-966-1020
Free, Fast and Accurate Information for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury Concerns
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March marks Brain Injury Awareness Month

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3/2/2017
Hana Rice, a guide with U.S. Military Outdoor Recreation, secures a climbing rope after repelling from an approximate 35 foot rock face within the National Network of Footpaths in the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg. Members of the climbing party were required to wear the appropriate climbing helmet and safety harness in order to prevent possible injuries such as traumatic brain injury. TBI awareness is observed throughout the month of March in hopes of spreading awareness of the trauma and potentially preventing future cases. (Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Brian Kimball)
March is National Brain Injury Awareness Month
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Partner with DVBIC to promote Brain Injury Awareness Month

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3/1/2017
Army Col. Geoffrey G. Grammer
The Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center is the DoD center of excellence for traumatic brain injury
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Seeing double? Brain injury could be cause

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2/6/2017
Ophthamologist Air Force Maj. Thuy Tran evaluates a patient during an eye exam. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. John Hughel)
Visual problems after a TBI often affect eye coordination and can be difficult to diagnose
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Winter sports safety: Got a helmet?

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2/2/2017
Army National Guard Spc. Charity McGeary, a combat medic with the 856th Military Police Company, does a backflip on her snowboard at Arizona Snowbowl in Flagstaff, Arizona. About 20 percent of skiing or snowboarding injuries are head injuries. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Brian Barbour)
Most people don’t associate winter sports with concussions the way football, soccer and lacrosse are
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BLAST: Greater speed, accuracy in recognizing brain injury

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1/18/2017
Marines shield themselves from a detonated explosive charge during a breaching exercise. Modern body armor better protects warfighters against shrapnel from explosive blasts. However, they still face the resulting blast pressure and shock wave that could cause traumatic brain injury. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Emmanuel Ramos)
The Office of Naval Research is sponsoring the development of a portable, three-part system that can measure blast pressure, establish injury thresholds for the brain and analyze potential TBI symptoms
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DCoE hot-topic blogs of 2016

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12/30/2016
Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health & Traumatic Brain Injury Logo
Throughout 2016, the Defense Centers of Excellence addressed many issues related to psychological health and traumatic brain injury
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History of military medical advancements in brain injury treatment

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12/19/2016
Army Sgt. Liliane Milo, a medic with 4th Infantry Division, checks in Soldiers for Military Acute Concussion Evaluations.
Much of our TBI awareness stems from progress in brain injury research by military medicine
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Air Force supports improved method for transporting TBI patients

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11/28/2016
Cornerstone Research Group’s aeromedical evacuation stretcher is shown during a compatibility test on a KC-135 aircraft. (Courtesy photo)
Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine scientists are testing and evaluating a novel aeromedical evacuation stretcher designed to safely transport traumatic brain and spinal injury patients in air and ground vehicles
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Depression symptoms can increase with concussion

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11/4/2016
U.S. Army Sgt. Eric Puglio, right, of Foxtrot Battery, 1st Battalion, 41st Field Artillery Regiment, 1st Armored Brigade bandages Army Sgt. Derrick Rouse's head after he received a simulated injury. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Carol A. Lehman)
A study shows that patients who are diagnosed with both a concussion and depression report more severe symptoms than patients with only a concussion
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Hearing loss and brain injuries

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9/30/2016
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Judith Bulkley, an electrical and environmental systems specialist deployed from the 23rd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, Moody Air Force Base, Ga., exits an A-10C Thunderbolt II after performing an external power operations check on the aircraft at Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan. Because service members in particular are often exposed to high noise levels, hearing protection is crucial, especially with a TBI. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Stephen Schester)
Becoming aware of how your surroundings can affect your hearing is a key factor in managing hearing problems associated with TBI
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Exiting an A-10C Thunderbolt

Photo
9/30/2016
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Judith Bulkley, an electrical and environmental systems specialist deployed from the 23rd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, Moody Air Force Base, Ga., exits an A-10C Thunderbolt II after performing an external power operations check on the aircraft at Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan. Because service members in particular are often exposed to high noise levels, hearing protection is crucial, especially with a TBI. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Stephen Schester)
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Judith Bulkley, an electrical and environmental systems specialist deployed from the 23rd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, Moody Air Force Base, Ga., exits an A-10C Thunderbolt II after performing an external power operations check on the aircraft at Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan. Because service members in particular are...
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The impact of traumatic brain injuries on community life

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9/27/2016
A soldier at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson’s traumatic brain injury clinic in Alaska takes a cognitive hand-eye coordination test on a driving stimulator.
A soldier at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson’s traumatic brain injury clinic in Alaska takes a cognitive hand-eye coordination test on a driving stimulator.
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The impact of traumatic brain injuries on community life

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A soldier at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson’s traumatic brain injury clinic in Alaska takes a cognitive hand-eye coordination test on a driving stimulator.
Dealing with the repercussions of a TBI, many find aspects of adjusting back into their communities difficult
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Public Health Service Cmdr. Robin Toblin speaks at TBI Summit

Photo
9/21/2016
Public Health Service Cmdr. Robin Toblin with the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research was one of the more than 1,700 health care providers and policy makers from the Military Health System, the Department of Veterans Affairs, academia and commercial research companies who met in person and virtually during the recent Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury Summit held at the Defense Health Headquarters in Falls Church, Virginia. (DCoE photo by Terry Welch)
Public Health Service Cmdr. Robin Toblin with the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research was one of the more than 1,700 health care providers and policy makers from the Military Health System, the Department of Veterans Affairs, academia and commercial research companies who met in person and virtually during the recent Defense Centers of Excellence...
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