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Seven Multistate Outbreaks of Human Salmonella Infections Linked to Live Poultry in Backyard Flocks | June 2016 | Salmonella | CDC

Seven Multistate Outbreaks of Human Salmonella Infections Linked to Live Poultry in Backyard Flocks | June 2016 | Salmonella | CDC

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC twenty four seven. Saving Lives, Protecting People



Eight Multistate Outbreaks of Human Salmonella Infections Linked to Live Poultry in Backyard Flocks (Final Update)



Posted October 6, 2016 2:45PM ET
These outbreak investigations are over. However, people can still get a 
Salmonella infection from live poultry, including those in backyard flocks. 
can reduce the chance they or their children will get an infection.






Highlights

  • Read the Advice to Backyard Flock Owners »
  • Although these outbreak investigations are over, people can still get a Salmonella infection from live poultry, including those kept in backyard flocks. Read more information about Salmonella from live poultry and how people can reduce their risk of infection. Regardless of where they were purchased, all live poultry can carry Salmonella bacteria, even if they look healthy and clean.
  • This year saw the largest number of illnesses linked to contact with backyard poultry ever recorded. These outbreaks are a reminder to follow steps to keep your family healthy while enjoying your backyard flock.
    • Always wash hands thoroughly with soap and water right after touching live poultry or anything in the area where the birds live and roam.
    • Do not let live poultry inside the house.
    • Do not let children younger than 5 years handle or touch chicks, ducklings, or other live poultry without adult supervision.
  • CDC, multiple states, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA-APHIS) investigated eight separate multistate outbreaks of human Salmonella infections linked to contact with live poultry in backyard flocks.
    • In the eight outbreaks, 895 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella were reported from 48 states.
    • Illnesses started on dates ranging from January 4, 2016 to September 10, 2016.
    • 209 ill people were hospitalized, and three deaths were reported. Salmonella infection was considered to be a cause of death for one person in Mississippi. Although the two people who died in Kentucky and New Jersey had a Salmonella infection, the infection was not considered to be a cause of death.
    • 254 (28%) ill people were children 5 years or younger.
  • Epidemiologic, traceback, and laboratory findings linked the eight outbreaks to contact with live poultry, such as chicks and ducklings, sourced from multiple hatcheries.


At A Glance

  • Case Count: 895
  • States: 48
  • Deaths: 3
  • Hospitalizations: 209
Image of baby chick


Outbreak Summary


Introduction
As of September 26, 2016, 895 people infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella were reported from 48 states. A list of states and the number of cases in each can be found on the Case Count Map page.
Among people for whom information is available, illnesses started on dates ranging from January 4, 2016 to September 10, 2016. Ill people ranged in age from less than 1 year to 106, with a median age of 27. Of ill people, 52% were female. Among 761 ill people with available information, 209 (27%) reported being hospitalized, and three deaths were reported. Salmonella was considered to be a cause of death for one person in Mississippi. Although the two people who died in Kentucky and New Jersey had a Salmonella infection, the infection was not considered to be a cause of death.
Investigation of the Outbreak
Epidemiologic, traceback, and laboratory findings linked the eight outbreaks to contact with live poultry, such as chicks and ducklings, from multiple hatcheries.
In interviews, ill people answered questions about contact with animals and foods consumed during the week before becoming ill. Contact with live poultry (chicks, chickens, ducks, ducklings) in the week before becoming ill was reported by 552 of 745 ill people interviewed, or 74%.
Ill people reported purchasing live baby poultry from several suppliers, including feed supply stores, Internet sites, hatcheries, and friends in multiple states. Ill people reported purchasing live poultry to produce eggs, learn about agriculture, have as a hobby, enjoy for fun, keep as pets, or to give as Easter gifts. Some of the places ill people reported contact with live poultry included their home, someone else’s home, work, or school settings.
Public health officials collected samples from live poultry and the environments where the poultry live and roam from the homes of ill people in several states or at locations of purchase in several states. Laboratory testing isolated five of the outbreak strains of Salmonella.
More information about each outbreak is available in the outbreak summaries below.

Summaries of the Eight Separate Multistate Outbreak Investigations

Previous Updates



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