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Student-Athletes' Views on APOE Genotyping for Increased Risk of Poor Recovery after a Traumatic Brain Injury. - PubMed - NCBI

Student-Athletes' Views on APOE Genotyping for Increased Risk of Poor Recovery after a Traumatic Brain Injury. - PubMed - NCBI



 2016 Dec;25(6):1267-1275. Epub 2016 May 21.

Student-Athletes' Views on APOE Genotyping for Increased Risk of Poor Recovery after a Traumatic Brain Injury.

Abstract

Use of apolipoprotein E genotyping to personalize the risk of a poor recovery after traumatic brain injury is complicated by the potential for genetic discrimination and the potential to reveal an increased risk for late onset Alzheimer's disease. We developed a survey to gauge interest in testing among athletes participating in National Collegiate Athletic Association programs. Eight hundred and forty seven student-athletes were surveyed to determine their interest in genetic testing, their willingness to share the results of testing with parents, coaches and physicians, their concerns about privacy and/or discrimination, and their interest in genetic counseling. Nearly three quarters of respondents expressed some level of interest in testing, with the largest number describing themselves as 'possibly interested' (54.9 %, n = 463) and a smaller number describing themselves as 'very interested' (18.9 %, n = 159). Most student-athletes said that receiving secondary information about their risk for late-onset Alzheimer's disease made them more likely to test (50.6 %, n = 426) rather than less likely to test (12.4 %, n = 104). Student-athletes were open to apolipoprotein E genotyping and willing to share test results with their parents, coaches and physicians. They did not anticipate that test results would impact their behavior or ability to play. Testing programs may be welcome but should provide clear information as to risks and benefits.

KEYWORDS:

APOE; Alzheimer’s disease; Apolipoprotein genotyping; Genetic discrimination; Genetic testing; NCAA; Traumatic brain injury

PMID:
 
27207686
 
DOI:
 
10.1007/s10897-016-9965-6

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