martes, 14 de marzo de 2017

Walter Reed makes new leadless pacemaker available to military patients | Health.mil

Walter Reed makes new leadless pacemaker available to military patients | Health.mil

Health.mil

Walter Reed makes new leadless pacemaker available to military patients

Surgeons at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center implant the leadless pacemaker. (U.S. Army photo)

Surgeons at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center implant the leadless pacemaker. (U.S. Army photo)



HEart surgeons at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center are giving patients a chance to live longer with a newly approved device that’s keeping their hearts beating.
Doctors there are implementing use of the leadless pacemaker, a device that was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in April 2016.
Leadless pacemakers don’t have the leads, or wires, found in traditional pacemakers. They’re significantly smaller than traditional pacemakers. Since there are no leads for the energy to pass through, the generator is able to make direct contact with heart tissue. This process takes less energy to pace the heart.
Navy Cmdr. (Dr.) Matthew Needleman, a cardiologist at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, holds the leadless pacemaker. (U.S. Army photo by Mark Oswell)Navy Cmdr. (Dr.) Matthew Needleman, a cardiologist at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, holds the leadless pacemaker. (U.S. Army photo by Mark Oswell)
“The ‘Achilles heel’ of traditional pacemakers has always been the pacemaker leads, long metal wires coated with a silicon/plastic that are tunneled from the pacemaker under the left collarbone into the heart,” said Navy Cmdr. (Dr.) Matthew Needleman, a cardiologist at Walter Reed.
Needleman noted the new pacemakers solve a few big problems. The leads on traditional pacemakers can fracture, dislodge and get infected. That infection can travel to the entire heart, leading to the removal of the pacemaker, a procedure that can lead to deadly results for the patient.
“Leadless pacemakers are implanted directly into the right ventricle in the heart, solving a significant portion of pacemaker lead problems,” Needleman said. “Without leads, this pacemaker has no lead to break. In addition, there have been over 3,000 implants worldwide and no cases of the leadless pacemaker dislodging.”
The body tends to form a capsule over the new pacemaker, which reduces the infection rate. Needleman says the overall complication rate of the leadless pacemaker is about half that of a traditional pacemaker.
“There’s also no surgical scar,” Needleman added.
Patients who receive the new pacemakers take less time to recover after surgery. Traditional pacemakers require a six-week period of post-implant restrictions. Most patients who receive the leadless pacemakers get back to normal life just a week after surgery.
The device is also good for patients with dementia and memory issues who may not always remember to follow the post-surgical guidelines associated with typical pacemakers.
Since the leadless pacemaker is only approved for use in the right ventricle, they can currently only be used in patients who need single chamber ventricular pacemakers. That’s about ten to 20 percent of patients who need pacemakers.
“As the technology advances, we will likely be able to implant this device or future generations of this device in other chambers in the heart,” Needleman said.
Needleman believes the next generation of leadless pacemakers could service multiple chambers and he expects future leadless pacemaker to be able to work with defibrillators.
Surgeons at Walter Reed implanted the first leadless pacemaker in the Washington, D.C., area in November. In the few short months since, physicians there have since implanted more of the devices than any other single institution in the area.
“We are currently the only DoD hospital to implant the leadless pacemaker. With our experience, we are looking at strategies to expand implantation of these devices in patients with difficult vascular access,” Needleman said.
While the military did not invent the device, it is making a difference for the military community. Medicare has not finalized the reimbursement for the new innovation, so it has not been used in many patients across the country. However, the military does not have to wait for Medicare reimbursements, so Walter Reed’s doctors are able to use it.
“We can do what’s right for our patients now,” Needleman added.
Disclaimer: Re-published content may have been edited for length and clarity. Read original post.




TOL Patient Portal Secure Messaging

Fact Sheet
3/9/2017
TRICARE Online Patient Portal(TOLPP)Secure Messaging (SM) provides Military Health System patients who receive care at a military treatment facility or clinic access to a robust messaging capability, allowing authorized patients the ability to securely communicate with their health care team.
Recommended Content:
Technology

Innovation summit highlights ideas to improve patient experience, care

Article
3/8/2017
Navy Rear Adm. David Lane shared his thoughts and questions with innovators after each presentation during the National Capital Region’s one-day innovation summit Feb. 27.
Proposals for various projects were pitched to Rear Admiral David Lane and the NCR Market Board during NCR’s Innovation Summit. Once approved, the proposals will move on to the pilot phase at a location throughout the NCR medical directorate.
Recommended Content:
Innovation

Joint Patient Safety Reporting

Fact Sheet
3/7/2017
Joint Patient Safety Reporting (JPSR) is a web-based application that integrates the Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of Veterans Affairs Healthcare Administration (VHA) patient safety reporting organizations to create a joint global application.
Recommended Content:
Technology | Patient Safety

New GERD treatment, first in DoD, performed at WBAMC

Article
3/2/2017
Army Maj. Michael Goldberg (left), chief, Gastroenterology, William Beaumont Army Medical Center, and Army Maj. Christopher Calcagno (right), gastroenterologist, WBAMC, speak to Army Staff Sgt. Mario Talavera (center), following the first incisionless fundoplication procedure to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) performed in the Department of Defense, at WBAMC. (U.S. Army photo by Marcy Sanchez)
A new Food and Drug Administration approved incisionless procedure to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease was performed recently at William Beaumont Army Medical Center
Recommended Content:
Military Hospitals and Clinics | Quality and Safety of Health Care

Personal responsibility is key to cybersecurity

Article
2/23/2017
Servio Medina, one of the Defense Health Agency’s Health Information Technology leaders on cybersecurity, implores his audience to practice positive cyber hygiene. (MHS photo)
Leader in cybersecurity discusses the risks of human error in cybersecurity at HIMSS
Recommended Content:
Technology

MHS IT director explains to HIMSS how recent updates will deliver more from less

Article
2/21/2017
Air Force Col. Richard Terry, the acting chief information officer for the MHS, enjoys a brief moment of levity as he spoke at the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) 2017 conference in Orlando, Florida, Feb. 20, 2017. (MHS photo)
In a time of tightening budgets, information technology serves as a critical component in the delivery of the best health care for Military Health System beneficiaries
Recommended Content:
Technology | MHS GENESIS

Course preps Army doctors, medics for deployment

Article
2/16/2017
Soldiers with Army Trauma Training Center’s Combat Extremity Surgery Course prepare a cadaver limb for placement of an external fixator. (U.S. Army photo by Marcy Sanchez)
The course is specifically designed to prepare the Soldiers for the care of wounded while deployed
Recommended Content:
Health Readiness | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Medical miracle: BAMC surgeons perform groundbreaking arm replant

Article
2/15/2017
Christopher Ebner (left to right), occupational therapist at the Center for the Intrepid, Kelsey Ward and Army Lt. Col. (Dr.) Joseph Alderete, chief of surgical oncology and CFI medical director, pose for a photo at the CFI. Ward's arm was severed when a guardrail pierced the passenger-side window of her SUV in a car wreck on April 20, 2016. Brooke Army Medical Center surgeons performed their first above-the-elbow arm replant on the 22-year-old trauma patient. (U.S. Army photo by Lori Newman)
Brooke Army Medical Center surgeons performed their first above-the-elbow arm replant on a 22-year-old trauma patient last year and almost 10 months later the patient is thriving
Recommended Content:
Extremities Loss | Military Hospitals and Clinics | Quality and Safety of Health Care

Tiny life-saving device receives FDA clearance

Article
2/3/2017
U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research senior scientist, Victor Convertino, Ph.D. (right), demonstrates the functions and capabilities of the Compensatory Reserve Index to Army Maj. Gen. Barbara Holcomb, commanding general, U.S. Army Medical Research and Material Command. (U.S. Army photo by Steven Galvan)
The ability to measure the body's capacity to compensate for blood loss has been the focus of researchers at the USAISR for years
Recommended Content:
Research and Innovation | Technology

TRICARE Online Patient Portal

Fact Sheet
1/31/2017
TRICARE Online Patient Portal (TOL) is the Department of Defense (DoD) online patient portal providing eligible beneficiaries access to military hospital and clinic appointing, prescription (Rx) refill, DoD Blue Button personal health data, Secure Messaging, Service Separation/Retirement and Nurse Advice Line.
Recommended Content:
Technology

Army orthopaedic residents fix breaks, break the mold

Article
1/27/2017
Army Capt. Marina Rodriguez (right), a third year resident with William Beaumont Army Medical Center’s Orthopaedic Residency Program, assists Army Lt. Col. Justin Orr, orthopaedic residency program director, during a total ankle replacement on a beneficiary. (U.S. Army photo by Marcy Sanchez)
With 25 residents on rotation and 12 staff surgeons, the Orthopaedic Residency Program at William Beaumont Army Medical Center is one of the largest in the Department of Defense
Recommended Content:
Military Hospitals and Clinics

Hospital goes low, high tech to ensure patient safety

Article
1/19/2017
Evans Army Community Hospital operating room nurse Regina Andrews performs a diagnostic test on the RFID wand. The wand is used to locate surgical sponges embedded with an RFID chip. (U.S. Army photo by Jeff Troth)
To ensure the count of medical sponges is correct in its operating rooms, Evans Army Community Hospital has started using radio-frequency ID sponges
Recommended Content:
Patient Safety | Military Hospitals and Clinics | Multi-Service Markets | Quality and Safety of Health Care | Innovation | Technology

Providing TLC for ICU babies

Article
1/19/2017
New mom Kimberly Neifert watches NICU Nurse Brandy Lor check the breathing rate of her daughter Ruelyn at Madigan Army Medical Center. Premature babies experience faster heart rates than adults and may also pause longer between breaths due to immature breathing patterns. (U.S. Army photo by Suzanne Ovel)
Needing the care of a neonatal ICU is not something most families anticipate
Recommended Content:
Children's Health | Women's Health | Access to Health Care | Military Hospitals and Clinics | Quality and Safety of Health Care | Puget Sound

BLAST: Greater speed, accuracy in recognizing brain injury

Article
1/18/2017
Marines shield themselves from a detonated explosive charge during a breaching exercise. Modern body armor better protects warfighters against shrapnel from explosive blasts. However, they still face the resulting blast pressure and shock wave that could cause traumatic brain injury. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Emmanuel Ramos)
The Office of Naval Research is sponsoring the development of a portable, three-part system that can measure blast pressure, establish injury thresholds for the brain and analyze potential TBI symptoms
Recommended Content:
Technology | Research and Innovation | Traumatic Brain Injury

WBAMC introduces robotic-assisted tubal re-anastomosis

Article
1/17/2017
Dr. Jennifer Orr, urogynecologist, William Beaumont Army Medical Center, stands in front of WBAMC's robotic surgical system which was used to perform the first robotic-assisted tubal re-anastomosis at WBAMC. The introduction of robotic assisted tubal re-anastomosis, commonly known as tubal ligation reversal, provides eligible beneficiaries with a third option for the procedure, an option studies show produces higher success rates for post-operation pregnancy. (U.S. Army photo by Marcy Sanchez)
William Beaumont Army Medical Center recently performed its first robotic-assisted surgery for tubal re-anastomosis
Recommended Content:
Technology | Women's Health

No hay comentarios:

Publicar un comentario en la entrada